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Chronic Disease Brief For Africa (February 2018) By Dara Oloyede

  • Nigeria: Striving To Achieve The WHO Global NCD Action Plan Alliance And Agenda For Sustainable Development

  • Nigeria: 75% Increase In Cancer Related Deaths By 2030

  • Sudan: 80% Drop In The Availability Of Psychiatric And Cancer Medicine

  • Zimbabwe: The First Lady’s Cervical Cancer Campaign

  • Ethiopia: Increase Prevention For Cervical Cancer 

 

Nigeria: Striving To Achieve The WHO Global NCD Action Plan Alliance And Agenda For Sustainable Development

Globally, 39.5 million people die each year from Non-Communicable Diseases (NCD’s) (Obinna, 2018). In order to combat this, Nigeria has set a goal to follow the WHO Global NCD Action Plan 2013-2020 and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to reduce 25% of premature deaths from NCDs by 2025 and 33% of all premature deaths and improve mental health by 2030. Dr. Sonny Kuku, the President of the Nigerian NCD Alliance, spoke about NCD’s at a workshop held in Lagos. He said that achieving the target goal of 25% would be challenging, and he noted the importance of early intervention before the diseases take effect. He offered that one solution is to increase funding for and to incorporate NCDs in Primary Healthcare Centers. This year the ministry of health will be disseminating a National Survey to assess NCDs risk factors and its impact throughout the nation (Obinna, 2018).

For more information check out the original article at Vanguard Nigeria: Alliance moves to reduce deaths from Non-Communicable Diseases

 

Nigeria: 75% Increase In Cancer Related Deaths By 2030

The WHO predicts that by 2030, a 75% percent increase is anticipated to rise in cancer related deaths in Nigeria (Tyessi, 2018). The burden of cancer is expected to rise due to the ageing population, chronic diseases, as well as from illnesses due to unhealthy lifestyles and risky behaviors. It is estimated that a third of cancer related deaths are due to preventable factors such as unhealthy diets, lack of physical activity, obesity, and tobacco and alcohol use. The author noted that often people’s choices to engage in certain behaviors are shaped by efforts outside of their control, such as the availability and marketing of certain food or tobacco and alcohol products (Tyessi, 2018). 

For more information check out the original article at This Day Live: Nigeria’s Death Rate from Cancer to Rise to 75% by 2030, Says WHO

 

Sudan: 80% Drop In The Availability Of Psychiatric And Cancer Medicine

The availability of medication for psychiatric and neurological treatment has dropped 80% (Dabanda, 2018). This shortage has delayed treatment in Sudan for over a month. Dr. Nasri Morgos, who is the head of the Private Pharmacies Association, said that many pharmacies are hesitant to buy expensive medications from overseas because many of their patients cannot pay for them. He said that about 60% of the patients who come to his pharmacy never return once they hear the increased prices of their medicines. He said that “medical treatment has become a privilege for the rich only” (Dabanga, 2018). In the beginning of January the government increased the customs rate of the US dollar, which has doubled the price of imported good like wheat and medicine (Dabanga, 2018).

For more information check out the original article at Dabanga Sudan: Psychiatric, cancer medicine availability drops 80% in Sudan

 

Zimbabwe: The First Lady’s Cervical Cancer Campaign

The First Lady of Zimbabwe, Auxillia Mnangagwa collaborated with the Ministry of Health and Child Care for a campaign to increase screenings for cervical cancer (The Herald, 2018). So far, over 8,500 were screened for cervical cancer. The Director of Family Health in the Ministry of Health and Child Care, Dr. Madzima, said that last year, the ministry was able to screen 5,000 women. This year marks a notable improvement in the Ministry's goal to screen more women. Dr. Madzima also noted that many women are hesitant to go for screenings, and data shows that annually over 2,270 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer. The First Lady plans to also take the campaign to rural areas as well. She said that “I might not be an expert in this field, but I will use my energy to make noise about cancer screening so that I play my part” (The Herald, 2018).

For more information check out the original article at The Herald: First Lady’s cancer campaign bears fruit

 

Ethiopia: Increase Prevention for Cervical Cancer

In Ethiopia cancer has become a serious concern (Tewodros, 2018). Many women who are dealing with cervical cancer were unaware of preventative measures and treatment they could have participated in. Fetiya Delgeba, who is the Gender, Mainstreaming and Beneficiary Director with the Ministry of Women and Children’s Affairs, said that it is important that women get screened. Many cervical cancer patients go to Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital for cancer screenings and other treatment services; others prefer to seek more traditional treatment. Dr. Ezkiel, a Gynecologist Specialist at the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia, said that sexually active women over 25 are susceptible to cervical cancer.  Dr. Ezkiel mentions that cultural factors such as stigma can prevent women from seeking pre-cancer screening as well as treatment. Interventions should seek to promote discussions about cervical cancer and encourage women to seek treatment. Even more important, the government and other engaged stakeholders must work to increase pre-cancer treatment throughout the country (Tewodros, 2018).

For more information check out the original article at The Ethiopian Herald: Early Treatment To Prevent Cervical Cancer

 

Dara Oloyede is the African News Correspondent for Engage Africa Foundation, and she is pursuing her Masters of Public Health. During her free time she likes to read books, spend time with friends, go to the movies, concerts, as well as events that celebrate different cultures. 

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