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Chronic Disease Brief For Africa (February 2019) By Dara Oloyede

  • Gambia: First Lady Spearheads Child Protection and Nutrition Project

  • Nigeria: 41,000 Cancer-Related Deaths

  • Sierra Leone: Tobacco Use a Challenge to Sustainable Development

  • USAID: Funding Announcement for Cervical Cancer Prevention in Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Nigeria: Organization blames Parents for Depression in Adolescents

 

Gambia: First Lady Spearheads Child Protection and Nutrition Project

On Jan 30th, 2019, First Lady Fatoumatta Bah-Barrow launched the “Nsaa Keno: Nutrition and Protection for Children on the Move Project” at Jarra Soma, Lower River Region (The Point, 2019). The purpose of this policy is to protect the rights of children and ensure that children have adequate nutrition in order to reduce malnutrition. This policy was also created in hopes to increase job opportunities (The Point, 2019).

For more information, check out this article at The Point: First lady launches Child Protection & Nutrition Project
 

Nigeria: 41,000 Cancer-Related Deaths

In 2018 the WHO estimated 116,000 new cases of cancer and discovered 41,000 cancer-related deaths (Premium Times, 2019). The WHO representative of Nigeria, Clement Peter, spoke about this issue during an event for World Cancer Day. Peter contributes these rates to the increased use of tobacco and alcohol, as well as an unhealthy living. The Theme for this World Cancer day is “I am and I will.” This theme was selected to remind people of the role they play in improving their health and minimizing the impact of cancer on their life. A report by Philips Consulting (PCI) revealed the negative financial impact cancer has on Nigerians. One of the findings estimated that the cost of treatment ranges between N850,000 and N3,600,000. Many of those who are affected by cancer, have to pay out of pocket. Peter urges that the government create an environment that helps to reduce risk factors for cancer (Premium Times, 2019). 

For more information check out this article at Premium Times: Cancer Killed 41,000 People in Nigeria in 2018-WHO

 

Sierra Leone: Tobacco Use a Challenge to Sustainable Development 

Samuel Doe, the Resident Representative of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), spoke at the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control 2030 Project (Tarawallie, 2019). In his speech, he said that tobacco use is a sustainable development challenge. The Tobacco Control 2030 project is being funded by the United Kingdom in order to reduce tobacco use. Dr. Donald Bash-Taqi, who is the Deputy Chief Medical Officer, spoke about the new tobacco legislation that has been created. The purpose of this legislation is to stop tobacco advertising, increase taxes, and implement smoke-free zones. The UNDP says that tobacco is a barrier to economic development is harmful to both smokers and non-smokers (Tarawallie, 2019).


For more information check out this article at Concord Times: Tobacco use is a sustainable development challenge

 

USAID: Funding Announcement for Cervical Cancer Prevention in Sub-Saharan Africa

USAID in collaboration with the U.S. National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine will spend $12 million to prevent cervical cancer in Malawi and Mozambique through expanding and developing programs to advance women’s health (USAID, 2019). In Malawi, funding will focus on a screen-and-treat strategy for HPV and cervical pre-cancerous lesions. In Mozambique, the funding will focus on evaluating new technologies and ways to address cervical cancer (USAID, 2019). 

For more information check out this article at USAID.gov: USAID Announces U.S.$12 Million for the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa

 

Nigeria: Organization blames Parents for Depression in Adolescents

A mental health NGO, Mind and Soul Helpers Initiative (MASHI), contributes the increase in adolescent depression to parents (Oredola, 2019). They say that the high standards set for children without regard for their ability to meet up to it is one of the causes. Program Director, Dr. Promise Adiele, says parents should work on being more understanding and less overbearing and critical. Further, he urges the government to change the law that criminalizes suicide or attempted suicide. He argues that those who attempt suicide are not doing so rationally. Clinical Psychologist, Mr. Ibiyokun Olawale said that it’s important to educate adolescents about mental health. He said that depression has resulted in an increase in suicides among the youth (Oredola, 2019). 

For more information check out this information at The Guardian: Group Blames Parents for Prevalence of Depression in Adolescents

 

Dara Oloyede is the African News Correspondent for Engage Africa Foundation. She holds her Masters of Public Health in Maternal and Child Health and Program Management. During her free time, she likes to read books, spend time with friends, go to the movies, concerts, as well as events that celebrate different cultures. 

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