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Chronic Disease Brief For Africa (September 2017) By Dara Oloyede

Nigeria: Seven Million Nigerians Have A Mental Health Related Condition

Liberia: Liberian Diabetes Center Says That Diabetes Should Be Everyone’s Concern

Ethiopia: Breast Cancer Replaces Cervical Cancer as Top Illness Among Women 

Nigeria: Doctors Advocate Ban On Tobacco Advertisements in Nigeria

Ghana: Non-Communicable Diseases Should Be Included In National Health Insurance Scheme 

 

Nigeria: Seven Million Nigerians Have A Mental Health Related Condition

Dr. Olabode Shabi, who is a medical consultant and Chairman of the Society of Family Physicians of Nigeria, wrote a paper called “Stress and Depression in Workplace: Strategic Approach to Management”.  In his research he found that 7 million Nigerians are currently dealing with mental health related issues due to stress and depression. He also identified major causes of workplace stress such as ambiguity in schedule, unstable work environment, lack of job security, and low trust level. In his paper, he highlights major symptoms as well as strategies to manage stress (Ogunje, 2017).

For more information check out this article at allafrica.com: Nigeria: Seven Million Nigerians Have Mental Related Ailments, Says Expert

 

Liberia: Liberian Diabetes Center Says That Diabetes Should Be Everyone’s Concern  

James Momoh, who is the chief executive officer of the Liberian Diabetes Center (LDC), says that Type 2 Diabetes should be a concern of everyone, especially the Ministry of Health. His organization's goal is to increase awareness and prevention efforts around diabetes. He noted that the lack of education about diabetes and diabetes management has led to many Liberians experiencing the adverse effects of diabetes such as blindness and impotence. The Liberian Diabetes Center provides programs where those with diabetes can learn how to manage the disease. Type 2 diabetes is the most prevalent disease in Liberia and type 3 diabetes is mostly prevalent among pregnant women. His organization is planning a pilot project to increase awareness about diabetes and plans to later expand (Jackson, 2017).

For more information check out this article at Liberianobserver.com: LDC Challenges GOL, Others to Fight Diabetes

 

Ethiopia: Breast Cancer Replaces Cervical Cancer as Top Illness Among Women

Breast cancer has replaced cervical cancer as one of the most prevalent medical conditions affecting women in Ethiopia. Dr. Bogale Solomon, who specializes in cancer treatment and is a member of the Ethiopian Medical Association, says that young women are very vulnerable to this disease. Malnutrition at an early age in addition to an unhealthy diet, lack of physical exercise, alcohol abuse, and poor work conditions are contributing risk factors that can lead to the development of breast cancer. Dr. Solomon says that prevention can be encouraged through educating the community about exercise, maternal health, nutrition, the symptoms of breast cancer and the importance of screenings (Tilahun, 2017).

For more information check out this article at allafrica.com: Ethiopia: Breast Cancer Replaces Cervical Cancer As Top Women Illness in Ethiopia

 

Nigeria: Doctors Advocate Ban On Tobacco Advertisements in Nigeria

The Epidemiological Society of Nigeria (EPISON) has called for a complete ban on tobacco related advertisements and sports sponsorships. High rates of tobacco use, in addition to alcohol abuse, poor nutrition and lack of physical exercise has resulted in a higher prevalence of non-communicable diseases. EPISON has called for more funding for research to address health challenges in Nigeria and an increase in the budget allocation for the health sector (Aduge-Ani, 2017). 

For more information check out this article at allafrica.com: Nigeria: Doctors Advocate Absolute Ban On Tobacco Adverts in Nigeria

 

Ghana: Non-Communicable Diseases Should Be Included In National Health Insurance Scheme

At a press conference Mr. Benjamin Anabila, the director of the Institute of Leadership and Development, advocated for non-communicable diseases to be included in the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS). It's inclusion in the NHIS would ensure that there would be coverage for non-communicable disease (NCD) related conditions and prevention campaigns. In order to ensure funding for increased health coverage, he suggested that the government increase the taxes on unhealthy foods and drinks and use those taxes to fund the NHIS. In Ghana NCD's make up 31% of the disease burden resulting in the deaths of 86,200 people each year. Ghana’s commitment to prioritizing the prevention, control and management of NCDs is evident, however due to the growing disease burden and demand for universal health coverage, the government must seek best practices and a plan of action to address funding challenges (Ghana News Agency, 2017).

For more information check out this article at ghananewsagency.org: Non-Communicable disease should be captured by NHIS

 

 

Dara Oloyede is the African News Correspondent for Engage Africa Foundation, and she is pursuing her Masters of Public Health. During her free time, she likes to read books, spend time with friends, go to the movies, concerts, as well as events that celebrate different cultures. 

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